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Schedule/Format

This page describes the following sections (click any of them to jump to that section):

Schedule
Organized Panels and Public Testimony
Jurors/Judges
Beyond the Hearing

Schedule

The People’s Hearing on Racism and Police Violence will take place on February 19th and 20th from 9am to 5pm.

Saturday, February 19

9:00      Sign in

9:30      Welcome & Introduction – Maisha Quint, EastSide Arts Alliance

9:40      Keynote address from Rachel Jackson (New Year’s Movement)

9:50      Poems by Suheir Hammad & Al B Back

10:00    Session 1:     Testimony on Racial Profiling

  • Sagnitcthe Salazar (Youth Together, Xicana Moratorium Coalition)
  • Eddy Zheng (Community Youth Center)
  • Manuel LaFontaine (All of Us or None)
  • Rama Kased & Samha Ayesh (Arab Resource & Organizing Center)
  • Liz Derias (Malcolm X Grassroots Movement)

Sitting Jurists:

Ajamau Baraka, Executive Director, US Human Rights Network

Alberto Saldamando, Lawyer, International Indian Treaty Council

Dennis Cunningham, Civil Rights Attorney

Bill Ong Hing, Professor, University of San Francisco School of Law

David Gespass, President, National Lawyers Guild

Dan Siegel, Civil Rights Attorney

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Professor Emerita, CSU Hayward

12:30    Question & answer period

1:00      Break for lunch

1:45      Poem by Donte Clark

2:00      Session 2:     Testimony on Police Killings

  • Cathy King (Gary King’s mother)
  • Sonya Wahnee (Andrew Moppin’s mother)
  • Jack Bryson (Family friend of Oscar Grant)
  • Frank Jones, Sr. (Derrick Jones’s father)
  • Kristopher Brown (Raheim Brown’s brother)
  • Lori Davis (Raheim Brown’s mother)

Sitting Jurists:

Ajamau Baraka, Executive Director, US Human Rights Network

Alberto Saldamando, Lawyer, International Indian Treaty Council

Dennis Cunningham, Civil Rights Attorney

Bill Ong Hing, Professor, University of San Francisco School of Law

David Gespass, President, National Lawyers Guild

Dan Siegel, Civil Rights Attorney

John Burris, Civil Rights Attorney

4:00      Questions & answer period

5:00      Summation and Closing for Day 1

A PEOPLE’S HEARING ON RACISM AND POLICE VIOLENCE

Sunday, February 20

9:00      Sign in

9:30      Welcome & Introduction – Jesse Strauss, Oakland 100 Committee

9:40      Keynote address from Sanyika Bryant (Malcolm X Grassroots Movement)

9:50      Video clip, “COINTELPRO 101” & Audioclip “Cointelpro: Then & Now”

10:00    Session 3:     Testimony on Cointelpro and Beyond

  • Richard Brown (San Francisco 8)
  • Claude Marks (Freedom Archives)
  • William Simmons (American Indian Movement)
  • Walter Riley (Attorney, Emergency Relief Fund

& Meiklejohn Civil Rights Institute)

  • Jabari Shaw (Laney Black Student Union)
  • Tim Killings (Laney Black Student Union)
  • Ghetto Prophet (Onyx)
  • Nina Farnia (Stop FBI Repression)

Sitting Jurists:

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Professor Emerita, CSU Hayward

Ben Rosenfeld, Civil Rights Attorney

Alberto Saldamando, Lawyer, International Indian Treaty Council

Dennis Cunningham, Civil Rights Attorney

David Gespass, President, National Lawyers Guild

Dan Siegel, Civil Rights Attorney

12:30    Question & answer period

1:00      Break for lunch

1:45      Poem by Paid Poets

2:00      Session 4:     Testimony on Organized Resistance

  • Tony Coleman (New Year’s Movement)
  • Aurora Lopez (Stop the Gang Injunctions Coalition, Xicana Moratorium Coalition)
  • Dorsey Nunn (Legal Services for Prisoners with Children)
  • Lily Haskell (Arab Resource & Organizing Committee)
  • Cinthya Muñoz (Just Cause: Causa Justa)
  • Mama Ayanna (Malcolm X Grassroots Movement)

Sitting Jurists:

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Professor Emerita, CSU Hayward

Alberto Saldamando, Lawyer, International Indian Treaty Council

Dennis Cunningham, Civil Rights Attorney

David Gespass, President, National Lawyers Guild

Dan Siegel, Civil Rights Attorney

4:00      Questions & answer period

5:00      Summation & Closing statement from Sanyika Bryant

——–

For further clarity, please note that for the purposes of this Tribunal Hearing we are making distinctions between three different types of testimony.

The testimony types and distinctions are as follows:
1. Direct Victim’s testimony: someone sharing her or his direct experience with a human rights violation at the hands of a government authority or institution.
2. Eye Witness testimony: someone sharing her or his direct experience witnessing a human rights violation.
3. Expert Testimony:
a. Testimony which details the effects of human rights abuses (police
brutality, murder, etc.) on affected individuals and communities.
b. Testimony which details state frame-ups, cover-ups, suppression of
evidence, and systemic government repression.
c. Testimony which details the grassroots and organized resistance to racism, sexism, homophobia, exploitation and state repression.

Organized Panels and Public Testimony

The fundamental purpose of the People’s Hearing on Racism and Police Violence is to allow people’s experiences to speak for themselves. Organizers of the event hope that it will facilitate space for those experiences to be exposed and explored.

The organized testimony panels will follow this format:

Each testimony will be 10 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for questions and answers from the jurors. At the end of each session, there will be at least 30 minutes allotted for questions and answers from the public.

People invited to give testimony have been asked to start from the following facts of their experience, and are invited to expand far beyond these limitations (given time constraints):
o Who (law enforcement agency, officers/officials involved, etc.),
o What (type of abuse, false arrest, illegal detention, gendered
discrimination, etc.)
o When (date and time), where (specific location)
o Why (reason provided by agency or official involved)
o How (manner in which abuse was executed)

People offering testimony are also asked to provide copies of any corroborating evidence relating to their experience/testimony.

Jurors/Judges

The program committee for the Hearing on Racism and Police Violence has invited jurors to play a vital role at and after the event. The juror panels, made up of lawyers and activists who have strong histories of involvement in supporting victims of police harrassment, will play a variety of roles.

Jurors will hear all the testimony given during the event, and for each person who speaks, there will be allotted time for the jurors to ask follow up questions, so that each experience is fully described and can be strongly documented.

Beyond the Hearing

After the hearing, jurors are being asked to write summary opinions of the testimony they heard and to produce their summary within three months of the Hearing.

The juror summaries and raw testimony will be used to advocate for Federal intervention on the recommendations produced from the Hearing to address the human rights violations raised and to press the demand that the Executive Branch adhere to its obligations under the CERD Treaty and create a National Plan of Action to Eliminate Racism and Racial Discrimination.

Additionally, the program committee along with the jurors will publish and disseminate the findings of the Hearing to a mass domestic audience and to advocates and experts in the international community.

Finally, Hearing organizers will submit the findings and opinions of the Hearing to several international human rights monitoring bodies and institutions, including the Inter-American Commission, the International Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and several United Nations Special Rapporteurs.

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